No One Left Behind: Advocating for Equitable Opportunities for Success in Tertiary Education

Session Information:

Saturday, 25 November 2023 09:05
Session: Session 1
Room: Room A (Live Stream)
Presentation Type: Featured Panel Presentation

All presentation times are UTC + 9 (Asia/Tokyo)

There is much literature on the global expansion of tertiary education and the exponential growth of online teaching platforms. This move has been expediated by the COVID-19 pandemic. This relentless rise in the use of Education Online Technologies (EOT) has necessitated a closer examination of how various equity groups have fared in this time of rapid change in education. It is proposed that all these changes in education do not necessarily bring about equal access, participation, and opportunity for success. Several issues have been noted when exploring the relationship between tertiary education and equity. However, less research is available on the relationship between culturally responsive, sustaining, and safe online teaching-learning spaces and equitable opportunities for success in learning. This panel argues that the heart of teaching and learning is in relational connectedness and the rapid reliance on Education Online Technologies (EOT) has led to the marginalisation of some social groups. The literature on equity of access, participation and success is mostly oriented towards some clearly defined social groups that were, or still are considered as being discriminated against. The primary objective of this panel presentation is to propose that focusing on access and opportunity in education will open the door to a discussion on issues of moral equality and the belief that human beings should be given equal access to life chances. This will ignite a different perception of ‘equity’ and how it is lived and practised in tertiary classrooms. It is envisioned that this will, in turn, move our professional dialogue into issues of moral equality and the fundamental right of human beings to equal access to life chances. This panel seeks to address some questions on social groups that favour relational pedagogy and face-to-face teaching-learning environments. How might this rapid global march towards online learning and the pervasive rise in technologically enhanced teaching-learning environments, disadvantage such groups? Will power imbalances contribute to one form of delivery subjugating the other; one way of knowing and doing enslaving the other? Will this then lead to unequal opportunities for participation and success for some social groups in tertiary education?

Biographies

Susie Kung
Manukau Institute of Technology, New Zealand

Susie Kung
Susie Kung has been in education since 1980 and in teacher education for over 26 years. She has been teaching in the Bachelor of Education programme at Manukau Institute of Technology (MIT) since 2006. She is a Senior Lecturer attached to the School of Education and is also the Academic Lead overseeing the provision of pastoral care and also the retention and success of four programmes in the School of Education. She has substantial experience in the field both in Malaysia and New Zealand.

Susie’s passion for teacher education includes her research on effective tertiary teaching-learning spaces and, more recently, blended teaching-learning environments through COVID-19 times, teacher identity and teacher motivation, preparing student teachers for a fast-changing, diverse world and a reconsideration of teacher education as a holistic endeavour. Case study and narrative approaches to research are her methodologies of choice, but she has a special interest in the Appreciative Inquiry approach to research and has used this methodology for a number of her research projects. She is currently investigating the role of teacher identity, teacher motivation, and the teacher’s perception of advocacy in the teaching role.

Mary Moeke
Manukau Institute of Technology, New Zealand

Mary Moeke, Manakau Institute of Technology, New Zealand
Mary Moeke is of Te Arawa and Ngāti Awa Māori descent and currently works in Te Kura Mātauranga (School of Education) at Te Pūkenga - Te Whare Takiura o Manukau, Auckland, New Zealand. Mary has been teaching for over 30 years, across all areas of the education sector. Her research portfolio shows a strong commitment to uphold Mātauranga Māori (knowledge and understanding that are Māori) in pursuit of mokopuna Māori (children who identify as Māori) having the best start to life and positive childhood experiences. As a result, her research interest has become more focused over time on reducing and eliminating child poverty by improving the professionalism and culturally responsive teaching practices within the early childhood sector that shift the social norms, challenge colonial practices, and encourage wealth creation growth and capability so that no one is left behind. Mary is currently working on a framework for positive change that operates as a Māori/Crown partnership and is supported by the Ministry of Social Development, New Zealand.

Yvonne Ualesi
AUT University, New Zealand

Yvonne Ualesi, Auckland University of Technology, New Zealand
Dr Yvonne Ualesi hails from the villages of Samoa (Mulivai Safata, Pu’apu’a, Saipipi, Savalalo, Lotopa), Tokelau (Fakaofo), and Fiji (Ovalau). She is a lecturer at Te Wānanga Aronui o Tāmaki Makau Rau (Auckland University of Technology) in Te Kura Mātauranga (School of Education) and lectures across the BEd Primary, BEd Early Child Education, and BA in Education degree programmes. A doctoral scholar, she completed her PhD at the University of Auckland, New Zealand. Yvonne’s PhD research was titled Culturally Responsive, Sustaining and Safe Youth Mentoring Practice in Aotearoa New Zealand – A Va Relational Approach. She developed a novel multimethod approach underpinned by indigenous knowledge systems to explore key ingredients in youth mentoring as a strategy of adolescent development. Her research interests include Pacific/Pasifika research methodologies and indigenous social psychology in education.

Her most recent scholarship as a co-editor of a special edition for the Ethnographic Edge Journal focussed on amplifying the voices of Pacific/Pasifika, indigenous principals, and school leadership, specifically on how they are shifting the system in education from an indigenous lens. Dr Ualesi is an early career researcher (ECR) forum committee member of the Royal Society of New Zealand as part of the national voice of New Zealand’s ECR community.


About the Presenter(s)
-Susie Kung has been in education since 1980 and in teacher education for over 26 years.
-Mary Moeke is of Te Arawa and Ngāti Awa Māori descent and currently works in Te Kura Mātauranga (School of Education) at Te Pūkenga - Te Whare Takiura o Manukau, Auckland, New Zealand.
-Dr Ualesi is an early career researcher (ECR) forum committee member of the Royal Society of New Zealand as part of the national voice of New Zealand’s ECR community.

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Posted by Kid Millie