Programme

Keynote, Featured and Spotlight Speakers will provide a variety of perspectives from different academic and professional backgrounds. This page provides details of presentations and other programming. For more information about presenters, please visit the Speakers page.


  • Sophisticated Machines and Innovative Education: Who (or What) Will Thrive?
    Sophisticated Machines and Innovative Education: Who (or What) Will Thrive?
    Keynote Presentation: Professor Keith W. Miller
  • Moving Forward by Going Back: Not Changing but Innovating
    Moving Forward by Going Back: Not Changing but Innovating
    Keynote Presentation: Dr Andy Curtis
  • High-Quality Classroom Assessment in Times of Change: From Purposes and Uses to Tasks and Environments
    High-Quality Classroom Assessment in Times of Change: From Purposes and Uses to Tasks and Environments
    Keynote Presentation: Dr Liying Cheng
  • The Things that Do Not Change
    The Things that Do Not Change
    Keynote Presentation: Dr Zachary M Walker
  • Leadership and Innovation
    Leadership and Innovation
    Featured Panel Presentation: Professor Kay Irie, Dr Peter McCagg, Professor Ljiljana Markovic & Dr Kristin Palmer
  • Teacher Competences Function as the Discourse of International Competitiveness within the Institutionalized Milieu in the Epoch of Globalization
    Teacher Competences Function as the Discourse of International Competitiveness within the Institutionalized Milieu in the Epoch of Globalization
    Keynote Presentation: Distinguished Professor Tien-Hui Chiang
  • Thriving in Publication: Ethical Guiding Principles for Academic Publication
    Thriving in Publication: Ethical Guiding Principles for Academic Publication
    Featured Panel Presentation: Dr Yvonne Masters & Dr Bernard Montoneri

Full Programme

The online version of the Conference Programme is now available to view below via the Issuu viewing platform. The Conference Programme can also be viewed on the Issuu website (requires a web browser). An Issuu app is available for Android users. Alternatively, download a PDF version.

The Conference Programme contains access information, session information and a detailed day-to-day presentation schedule. All registered delegates who attend conference receive a printed copy of the Conference Programme at the Registration Desk on arrival. Only one copy of the Conference Programme is available per delegate, so please take good care of your copy.

For an overview of the conference schedule, please see the Conference Outline page.


Previous Programming

View details of programming for past ACE conferences via the links below.

Sophisticated Machines and Innovative Education: Who (or What) Will Thrive?
Keynote Presentation: Professor Keith W. Miller

Over 10 years ago, educational researchers in California placed a robot made in Japan in a classroom of toddlers, aged 18 to 24 months. After 5 months, the authors stated that the toddlers “treated the robot as a peer rather than as a toy.” [1, pg. 17954]

Five years ago, researchers in Japan and Israel programmed robots to teach six graders about the physics of levers. According to surveys, the students were pleased with the lesson, and most scored well on a quiz about levers. [2]

Today, people are seriously considering the idea of robot teachers becoming a mainstream educational innovation. Some people are excited about that prospect, but others are worried. [3]

In this talk, we will explore the issue the increasing role of sophisticated machines (robots, webbots, and other devices) in education. What are the costs and benefits? Who loses and who gains as more machines enter the classroom? And how are technical advances in robotics likely to affect this trend?

References:

[1] Tanaka, F., Cicourel, A., & Movellan, J. R. (2007). Socialization between toddlers and robots at an early childhood education center. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, 104(46), 17954-17958.

[2] Hashimoto, T., Kobayashi, H., Polishuk, A., & Verner, I. (2013, March). Elementary science lesson delivered by robot. In Proceedings of the 8th ACM/IEEE international conference on Human-robot interaction (pp. 133-134). IEEE Press.

[3] Sharkey, A. J. (2016). Should we welcome robot teachers?. Ethics and Information Technology, 18(4), 283-297.

Read presenter biographies.

Moving Forward by Going Back: Not Changing but Innovating
Keynote Presentation: Dr Andy Curtis

According to the well-known American educator John Dewey (1859-1952): “if we teach today as we taught yesterday, we rob our children of tomorrow”. There are (very) few educators in the world today who would (strongly) disagree with that statement, and yet we still struggle and resist change. Why? One set of important reasons is the differences between ‘Change’ and ‘Innovation’. We will, therefore, begin this talk by looking at some of those important distinctions.

We will then look at why people – all of us – resist change, as a normal and natural, ancient and hardwired response, especially when changes are imposed upon us. Research has shown that teachers can be impressively effective at ‘faking forced change’, by which I mean teachers pretending to change, while not really doing so, except at the superficial level, when they have not been involved in the decision-making change process.

In the present global political and socioeconomic climate, Dewey’s 1916 book, Democracy and Education: An introduction to the philosophy of education, is still remarkably relevant, more than a century after it was first published. Re-visiting Dewey’s work on education, and the centuries-old work of other educators in other countries, is an example of ‘Moving Forward by Going Back’. The talk will also include proposals for re-introducing concepts and subjects such as Critical Thinking back into education, as the daily international news is ripe with examples of people who appear to have lost that ability (if they ever had it) which must be a central core of education in times of change.

Read presenter biographies.

High-Quality Classroom Assessment in Times of Change: From Purposes and Uses to Tasks and Environments
Keynote Presentation: Dr Liying Cheng

In the present educational climate, teachers are continually faced with complex assessment issues. There is a great deal of discussion now in education about alignment as a guiding principle for high quality assessment; that is, the degree of agreement amongst standards, curriculum, learning outcomes, assessment tasks (including tests) and instruction. Alignment, along with validity, reliability, fairness, consequences, and practicality, are viewed as central aspects of assessment practice which supports learning. Assessment serves as the key process to check on learning and provide essential information to teachers. Assessment is an on-going, iterative, and cyclical process of supporting students throughout teaching.

Undoubtedly, most of the information that students have about their learning, about themselves, and about their futures comes from classroom assessment. Similarly, most of what parents and teachers know about their children's learning comes from classroom assessment. It is through the day-to-day classroom assessment tasks and the environment teachers and students co-create that important decisions (purposes and uses) are understood, communicated, and reported. The ways teachers communicate their expectations to students, and the ways they provide feedback on how well these expectations are being met, help students form the concepts of what is important to learn and how good they are at learning it. Current debates about quality of classroom assessment continue to use validity and reliability arguments developed for large-scale testing. This plenary highlights the context dependence of classroom assessment in relation to large-scale testing, and discusses the intricate relationship between assessment and instruction through assessment tasks and environment in supporting student learning.

Read presenter biographies.

The Things that Do Not Change
Keynote Presentation: Dr Zachary M Walker

During times of turbulence in education, it is important to consider the truths we know and understand about teaching and learning. However, it is also important to acknowledge that many of these truths are not being practiced in classrooms and schools today although the research clearly shows their effectiveness. In this talk we will consider how to be nimble in teaching and learning while also utilising and implementing practices that are evidence-based and proven to work.

Read presenter biographies.

Leadership and Innovation
Featured Panel Presentation: Professor Kay Irie, Dr Peter McCagg, Professor Ljiljana Markovic & Dr Kristin Palmer

Good leadership can make the difference between merely surviving and fully thriving in any setting. Educators in Japan and around the world have been facing numerous changes over the past two decades, but for many this is the time to crumple or break out. Long running trends are leading to both crises and opportunities; innovative leadership will separate the educational institutions and programs that thrive from those that eke out survival or, perhaps, even fall.

This panel brings together leaders in creating new, innovative programs in higher education; who either find creative ways to work within constraints or who move beyond those constraints to create something new. Peter McCagg and Kay Irie are leaders in two Japanese universities, Akita International and Gakushuin, Kristin Palmer is leading new developments for the University of Virginia in the United States, and Ljiljana Markovic is Dean of the Faculty of Philology and has helped forge many international partnerships with various universities.

It may be argued that education can be too cautious and slow to change, thus leaving it vulnerable to economic and demographic changes. Sometimes a lack of resources, fiscal and social capital, means that even a will to change cannot be put into action. This means that we need to look to educators who are currently facing challenges that we are all likely to face as the demographic pyramid, advances in ICT, and political trends common in the host country for this conference become common throughout developed economies. Likewise, in Japan we should learn from efforts in and across developing countries in making good use of ICT as another way forward.

No matter the challenge or opportunity, institutions must nurture developing leaders within and be open to them from without. How exactly can we do this?

The panel audience will be invited to ask questions and pose challenges that are relevant internationally.

Read presenter biographies.

Teacher Competences Function as the Discourse of International Competitiveness within the Institutionalized Milieu in the Epoch of Globalization
Keynote Presentation: Distinguished Professor Tien-Hui Chiang

As the discourse of international competitiveness has facilitated government becoming the global agent, proactively promoting the advantages of teacher competences, teachers are required to be constructive contributors to national development. This great change highlights the new thought that teacher professional development no longer belongs to the sphere of personal matters but to the domain of collective accountabilities. This new paradigm tends to form an institutionalized milieu, in which teachers implement and the government designs. However, such an institutionalized array turns the coercive force of performativity into the voluntarism of neo-professionalism through the process of “reformulating education”. This relationship indicates that the concept of isomorphism is regulated by the global discourse that constantly redefines the state’s role in teacher professional development.

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Thriving in Publication: Ethical Guiding Principles for Academic Publication
Featured Panel Presentation: Dr Yvonne Masters & Dr Bernard Montoneri

Publication is one of the core tasks in the professional lives of academics, whether it as editors, authors, or readers. In the current atmosphere of impact factors and high stakes funding, publication is imperative for our survival as teachers and researchers. It is both an intellectual concern, and also hands-on practical work. Surviving “in times of change” clearly applies to publishing over last decade, since the ACE conference series first began. However, how does one not only survive, but thrive, amidst the uncertainties and ever mounting pressures? If ethics are the “moral principles that govern a person's behaviour or the conducting of an activity,” (Oxford Dictionaries) then a re-examination of the ethics of publishing, particularly in an era of open-access and a plethora of social networking sites for researchers to share their work, should help to lead us towards better relationships amongst all concerned: researchers, writers, editors, publishers, librarians, tenure and hiring committees, the humble reader, and even the students in our charge.

The panel will address the ethical implications of a range of issues in publication including:

This will be a wide-ranging and deep dive into the questions facing the world of academic publishing.

Read presenter biographies.