Programme

Keynote, Featured and Spotlight Speakers will provide a variety of perspectives from different academic and professional backgrounds. This page provides details of presentations and other programming. For more information about presenters, please visit the Speakers page.


  • Change in Academic Writing Education
    Change in Academic Writing Education
    Featured Presentation: Dr Paul Lai
  • Change in Education: By Whom? For Whom?
    Change in Education: By Whom? For Whom?
    Featured Presentation: Dr Yvonne Masters
  • Skills for the Future: How Mentoring Students Through Undergraduate Research Provides Tools for Success After University
    Skills for the Future: How Mentoring Students Through Undergraduate Research Provides Tools for Success After University
    Featured Presentation: Professor José McClanahan
  • Cultural competence and the higher education sector: Implications for teaching, learning and leadership.
    Cultural competence and the higher education sector: Implications for teaching, learning and leadership.
    Featured Presentation: Dr Jack Frawley
  • Continuing Professional Development for Educational Professionals in Secondary Schools: A Case Study of a Leadership Empowerment Program in Taiwan
    Continuing Professional Development for Educational Professionals in Secondary Schools: A Case Study of a Leadership Empowerment Program in Taiwan
    Spotlight Presentation: Dr Tzu-Bin Lin

Additional presentations and other programming will be announced in the coming months.

Change in Academic Writing Education
Featured Presentation: Dr Paul Lai

There have been some major changes in academic writing education since its official introduction in the 1950s. One of the changes relates to student needs. When academic writing education was introduced in the United States, it was targeted at students who were “underprepared” and lacked competent English skills in academic writing. Thus the primary objective of this education was to teach those students how to write well in English. However, nowadays more and more students, especially graduate students, enroll in writing courses not because they lack the language skills, but because they want to learn how to clarify and support their central research idea in a research paper so that the paper can pass the review for publication. To help the students develop clear and convincing ideas in their writing, it is necessary to incorporate logical thinking training into academic writing education. In my talk, I will explain how this new writing education has been implemented at Nagoya University since 2010.

Read presenter biographies on the Speakers page.

Change in Education: By Whom? For Whom?
Featured Presentation: Dr Yvonne Masters

Heraclitus has been credited with saying that “change is the only constant in life”. In education, change is definitely constant, but this has many different meanings. Both in the classroom and in the corridors of policy, change is continuous, often under the banner of “education FOR change”. However, the deeper questions revolve around for whom the change is meant and by whom the change is to be implemented. This is particularly the case in the arena of teacher education. Taking examples from the current Australian context, this presentation explores changes in teacher education policy in terms of both teacher candidate selection and programme accreditation. It will be demonstrated how the selection changes being implemented are exclusionary with the potential to perpetuate social injustices. There will also be exploration of the narrowing of curriculum offerings through the new accreditation process, resulting in a more mechanistic education for children in schools. The presentation will conclude by comparing the context in Australia with other international contexts and raising the question as to how best to educate our future teachers for the changes they will be asked to implement in their classrooms.

Read presenter biographies on the Speakers page.

Skills for the Future: How Mentoring Students Through Undergraduate Research Provides Tools for Success After University
Featured Presentation: Professor José McClanahan

It is important that educators continue to adapt and develop new approaches that create equal opportunities for productive educational experiences for all students. One key way in which we can accomplish this goal is through collaborative mentoring and research with undergraduate students. The work these students do with faculty will provide them with the tools they need to be successful after graduation. The sciences (biology, chemistry or physics) have already had success in creating research programmes for students. Yet, many outside of these traditional sciences (i.e. Humanities, Fine Arts, or Social Sciences) may not fully grasp how they can incorporate students into their own research projects and what it means to work with undergraduates in their scholarship. Therefore, this presentation explores how faculty can include students in our research, help dissipate some of the commonly held myths about undergraduate students in research, and discover the benefits of this work for students as they look toward life after they leave university and college campuses.

Read presenter biographies on the Speakers page.

Cultural competence and the higher education sector: Implications for teaching, learning and leadership.
Featured Presentation: Dr Jack Frawley

In the last 15 years in the Australian higher education sector, international student enrolments have grown from close to 100,000 in 2002 to over 300,000 in 2017 with the majority of these students from mainland China. In parallel with this growth, the Australian higher education sector has focused on Graduate Attributes (GA). GA have been defined as core abilities and values which are both needed socially and professionally, and which are developed in students during their studies and experiences in higher education. GA are also used to inform curriculum and learning outcomes. GA have been expressed as belonging to a 2020 vision for Australian higher education where the system produces graduates with not only the requisite knowledge and skills but also the understandings, capability or attributes permits the individual to think flexibly or act intelligently in intercultural situations. Currently twelve Australian universities include GA that encompass statements on cultural competence and the ability of graduates to engage with diverse cultural and Indigenous perspectives in both global and local settings. But what is meant by cultural competence and what are the implications for teaching, learning and leadership? This presentation will unpack cultural competence within the higher education context; identify the challenges faced not only by students but academics and leadership; and, suggest ways in which cultural competence can be meaningfully engaged and applied.

Read presenter biographies on the Speakers page.

Continuing Professional Development for Educational Professionals in Secondary Schools: A Case Study of a Leadership Empowerment Program in Taiwan
Spotlight Presentation: Dr Tzu-Bin Lin

In the past two decades, Taiwanese education has experienced drastic changes due to the transformation from dictatorship to democracy. As a key component of education reform, school leadership requires more attention, especially in local Taiwanese context. Internationally, the importance of leadership on improving school effectiveness and student performance is widely acknowledged (Day et al., 2011). However, there is not much research literature exploring the professional development in fostering educational professionals’ leadership capacity in leading curriculum changes. This paper aims at presenting a case study of a three-year continuing professional development (CPD) program for educational professionals in Taiwanese secondary schools with a specific focus on curriculum leadership. This CPD program is a sequential professional development program to develop curriculum leadership among educational professionals in secondary schools in Taiwan. In this paper, some questions will be explained and discussed: Why is this CPD program developed? What are the designing principles and key components of this CPD program and who are the targeting participants? How is this CPD program implemented? What are the implications after evaluating this CPD program? Data are from documents including meeting minutes of program developers and course materials, interviews transcripts of participants, lesson observations done by the researcher and questionnaires to participants to gain their feedback. The case study can provide international readers who are interested in CPD and curriculum leadership in secondary schools with insights on the design, implementation and reflection of an existing program.

Read presenter biographies on the Speakers page.