Programme

Keynote, Featured and Spotlight Speakers will provide a variety of perspectives from different academic and professional backgrounds. This page provides details of presentations and other programming. For more information about presenters, please visit the Speakers page.


  • Sophisticated Machines and Innovative Education: Who (or What) Will Thrive?
    Sophisticated Machines and Innovative Education: Who (or What) Will Thrive?
    Keynote Presentation: Professor Keith W. Miller
  • Moving Forward by Going Back: Not Changing but Innovating
    Moving Forward by Going Back: Not Changing but Innovating
    Keynote Presentation: Dr Andy Curtis
  • High-Quality Classroom Assessment in Times of Change: From Purposes and Uses to Tasks and Environments
    High-Quality Classroom Assessment in Times of Change: From Purposes and Uses to Tasks and Environments
    Keynote Presentation: Dr Liying Cheng
  • To Publish or to Perish, that is the Question
    To Publish or to Perish, that is the Question
    Featured Panel Presentation: Dr Bernard Montoneri & Dr Yvonne Masters
  • The Things that Do Not Change
    The Things that Do Not Change
    Keynote Presentation: Dr Zachary M Walker

Previous Programming

View details of programming for past ACE conferences via the links below.

Sophisticated Machines and Innovative Education: Who (or What) Will Thrive?
Keynote Presentation: Professor Keith W. Miller

Over 10 years ago, educational researchers in California placed a robot made in Japan in a classroom of toddlers, aged 18 to 24 months. After 5 months, the authors stated that the toddlers “treated the robot as a peer rather than as a toy.” [1, pg. 17954]

Five years ago, researchers in Japan and Israel programmed robots to teach six graders about the physics of levers. According to surveys, the students were pleased with the lesson, and most scored well on a quiz about levers. [2]

Today, people are seriously considering the idea of robot teachers becoming a mainstream educational innovation. Some people are excited about that prospect, but others are worried. [3]

In this talk, we will explore the issue the increasing role of sophisticated machines (robots, webbots, and other devices) in education. What are the costs and benefits? Who loses and who gains as more machines enter the classroom? And how are technical advances in robotics likely to affect this trend?

References:

[1] Tanaka, F., Cicourel, A., & Movellan, J. R. (2007). Socialization between toddlers and robots at an early childhood education center. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, 104(46), 17954-17958.

[2] Hashimoto, T., Kobayashi, H., Polishuk, A., & Verner, I. (2013, March). Elementary science lesson delivered by robot. In Proceedings of the 8th ACM/IEEE international conference on Human-robot interaction (pp. 133-134). IEEE Press.

[3] Sharkey, A. J. (2016). Should we welcome robot teachers?. Ethics and Information Technology, 18(4), 283-297.

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Moving Forward by Going Back: Not Changing but Innovating
Keynote Presentation: Dr Andy Curtis

According to the well-known American educator John Dewey (1859-1952): “if we teach today as we taught yesterday, we rob our children of tomorrow”. There are (very) few educators in the world today who would (strongly) disagree with that statement, and yet we still struggle and resist change. Why? One set of important reasons is the differences between ‘Change’ and ‘Innovation’. We will, therefore, begin this talk by looking at some of those important distinctions.

We will then look at why people – all of us – resist change, as a normal and natural, ancient and hardwired response, especially when changes are imposed upon us. Research has shown that teachers can be impressively effective at ‘faking forced change’, by which I mean teachers pretending to change, while not really doing so, except at the superficial level, when they have not been involved in the decision-making change process.

In the present global political and socioeconomic climate, Dewey’s 1916 book, Democracy and Education: An introduction to the philosophy of education, is still remarkably relevant, more than a century after it was first published. Re-visiting Dewey’s work on education, and the centuries-old work of other educators in other countries, is an example of ‘Moving Forward by Going Back’. The talk will also include proposals for re-introducing concepts and subjects such as Critical Thinking back into education, as the daily international news is ripe with examples of people who appear to have lost that ability (if they ever had it) which must be a central core of education in times of change.

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High-Quality Classroom Assessment in Times of Change: From Purposes and Uses to Tasks and Environments
Keynote Presentation: Dr Liying Cheng

In the present educational climate, teachers are continually faced with complex assessment issues. There is a great deal of discussion now in education about alignment as a guiding principle for high quality assessment; that is, the degree of agreement amongst standards, curriculum, learning outcomes, assessment tasks (including tests) and instruction. Alignment, along with validity, reliability, fairness, consequences, and practicality, are viewed as central aspects of assessment practice which supports learning. Assessment serves as the key process to check on learning and provide essential information to teachers. Assessment is an on-going, iterative, and cyclical process of supporting students throughout teaching.

Undoubtedly, most of the information that students have about their learning, about themselves, and about their futures comes from classroom assessment. Similarly, most of what parents and teachers know about their children's learning comes from classroom assessment. It is through the day-to-day classroom assessment tasks and the environment teachers and students co-create that important decisions (purposes and uses) are understood, communicated, and reported. The ways teachers communicate their expectations to students, and the ways they provide feedback on how well these expectations are being met, help students form the concepts of what is important to learn and how good they are at learning it. Current debates about quality of classroom assessment continue to use validity and reliability arguments developed for large-scale testing. This plenary highlights the context dependence of classroom assessment in relation to large-scale testing, and discusses the intricate relationship between assessment and instruction through assessment tasks and environment in supporting student learning.

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To Publish or to Perish, that is the Question
Featured Panel Presentation: Dr Bernard Montoneri & Dr Yvonne Masters

More than 50 million academic papers have been published in the world so far and around 2.5 million papers are published every year in around 30,000 active scholarly peer-reviewed journals. Millions of scholars are doing research nowadays and it is becoming increasingly challenging to publish a work that will be creative and original enough to get accepted in a reputable journal. Academic recognition is essential as almost all institutions require professors and scholars to demonstrate their ability to contribute to their field of knowledge; applying for promotion and tenure seems almost impossible without several publications in reputable international journals. Pressure to publish is high and many universities require teachers to have promotion within a few years (employment contracts often stipulate that instructors who cannot promote might be fired). The stress to get a paper published is never decreasing as teachers need to apply for grants to participate to international conferences and to fund research. In this presentation, I would like to share my experience as an editor and some insight on the publication process, from having an original idea to editing and publishing a paper. The presentation will be divided into six sections: 1) Finding an original idea and having a contribution (cross-language and cross-field research) 2) Doing research alone vs. academic collaboration (list of authors, first author, corresponding author) 3) Finding the right conference and the right journal (beware of predatory conferences and journals) 4) The writing process (the outline, the language, the logic, the data, the results, and the importance of the references) 5) 10 ways to have you paper accepted…or not (out of scope, poor writing, little contribution, plagiarism and self-plagiarism, etc.) 6) Academic reputation (career building, where to share one’s publications efficiently).

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The Things that Do Not Change
Keynote Presentation: Dr Zachary M Walker

During times of turbulence in education, it is important to consider the truths we know and understand about teaching and learning. However, it is also important to acknowledge that many of these truths are not being practiced in classrooms and schools today although the research clearly shows their effectiveness. In this talk we will consider how to be nimble in teaching and learning while also utilising and implementing practices that are evidence-based and proven to work.

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